nursing news

Nurse Margie Long was a 24-year-old nurse when she saw the smallest baby she’d ever seen. Long still meets with the premature baby she nursed to health, who is now a 66-year-old great-grandmother herself. Read this story and more in the top nursing news from the week:

Bond between 1947 “Preemie” and Nurse Endures Decades

In 1947, Sharon Bolles was born weighing just 1 pound, 14 ounces. Nurse Margie Long devoted herself to caring for the newborn, who she still calls “my preemie,” feeding her a teaspoon of milk from a medicine dropper every hour. Their bond has lasted for more than 60 years. “She never, ever missed my birthday or Christmas,” Bolles said. “I know how special she is, I’ve always known that.” Read more of their story at St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Hospitals Benefit from Nurses in Leadership Roles

Nurses understand healthcare delivery from the ground up and bring an important perspective to leadership roles. “We take for granted our skills, our problem-solving abilities, and our ability to work in hideous complex settings, under enormous stress, and save lives,” said Connie Curran, EdD, RN, FAAN, a member of Chamberlain’s Board of Trustees and co-author of Claiming the Corner Office: Executive Leadership Lessons for Nurses. “It’s important those skills and perspectives move up the ladder to the C-suite, to the CEO and to boards.”  Read more at NurseZone.com.

The #1 Key to Success as a Nurse

The #1 key to success for nurses? Honesty. “Being honest is the key to success in this profession. And I’m talking global honesty across every facet of your job,” writes nurse Sean Dent. “I have learned over the years to be honest about your skills, your knowledge and your performance with your physician partners – they will respect your honesty more than any lie you can tell.” Read more at Scrubs Magazine.

A New Nurse Role: Clinical Nurse Leader

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing has announced a new master’s prepared role: the clinical nurse leader (CNL).“Healthcare is increasingly complex, and we need leaders who are trained in complexity theory to be able to navigate that and understand it to have better patient outcomes and that’s what clinical nurse leaders are uniquely trained to do,” said Bob LaPointe, MS, MSN, RN, CNL, president, Clinical Nurse Leader Association. Read more from ADVANCE for Nurses

Chamberlain Recognized in Great 100 Nurses of Northeast Florida

The Great 100 Nurses of Northeast Florida recognizes four of Chamberlain’s own: Kathy Walls, RN, PhD; Donna Jeanne Pugh, RN, MSN/ED; Sonia Maria Balevre, RN, MSN; and Sherri Kuhnell, RN, MSN/Ed. Patients, colleagues and community members nominated the nurses for their achievements. Congratulations to these extraordinary Chamberlain nurses! Read more about the nominations at Nurse.com.

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