Emmanuel Patrick Palma Jr., a registered nurse, is an implementation manager at a leading healthcare system north of Chicago. He works with an integrated electronic health record (EHR) system now used in 70 percent of U.S. hospitals that no longer use paper charts to deliver patient care.[1], [2]

“I like to be the bridge between the nursing and IT sides of healthcare, knowing how to clinically and technically operate within the system,” he said. “Patients appreciate that with EHRs, they can go to their primary care physician or the emergency room and all of their healthcare information is available to the nurses and physicians. The care they receive is targeted to address their unique medical history and long-term wellness.”

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Did you know that over the course of a lifetime, 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer? Men are also at risk – 1 in 1,000 will develop breast cancer. And while white women are slightly more likely to develop breast cancer, African-American women are more likely to die from the disease.[1]

Rachel Choudhury, MSN, RN, CNE, curriculum and instruction specialist at Chamberlain College of Nursing, sheds light on other risk factors and shares tips to educate men and women so they can be proactive about their breast health.

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In an increasingly complex healthcare landscape, healthcare leaders are exploring solutions for improving patient outcomes and efficiency while managing costs. Many are taking a closer look at person and family centered care, an evolving approach for nurses and other clinicians to streamline and improve care by engaging patients and their families as partners in the care process.

Person and Family Centered Care, published by The Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International, explores this approach to caregiving with insight from authors Joanne Disch, PhD, RN, FAAN, Jane Barnsteiner, PhD, RN, FAAN and Mary K. Walton, MSN, MBE, RN.

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Military service can involve occupational health risks as severe as those one might experience from being a part of a hazmat team. Yet many patients with military backgrounds do not notify medical professionals of their service.

Linda Schwartz, DrPH, MSN, RN, commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Veterans’ Affairs (VA), says nurses can play a critical role in identifying veterans’ health risks that may be associated with wars and other military deployments. READ MORE

Daytime talk show host Katie Couric recently paid tribute to nurses and the important role they play in their patients’ lives. Her guest, Diana Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN, president of the American Academy of Nursing (AAN), highlighted another critical role of today’s nurses: decision-maker.

“In 2010, a study from the Institute of Medicine reported that nurses are not being used to their full potential,” Mason explained. “This finding is key because it recognizes that we cannot transform healthcare in our country without tapping into the potential of our nurses and the important role they can play at decision-making tables at all levels of healthcare organizations and for all healthcare policies.”

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Hannah Byers, a student in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree program at Chamberlain College of Nursing’s Columbus campus, is working to help combat a national epidemic — the rising number of heart attacks and strokes. And she’s doing it through preventative care.

Each year, Americans suffer more than two million heart attacks and strokes.[1] The healthcare industry is evolving to focus on preventive care in an effort to lower healthcare costs and the prevalence of chronic disease such as these. Hannah and her peers hope to prevent these conditions, which are the first and fourth leading causes of death in the United States.[2]

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Dwayne and Veronica Bryant, now husband and wife student nurses at Chamberlain College of Nursing’s Jacksonville campus, met while they were serving in the U.S. Air Force. Through experiences during their military service, they were soon drawn to careers in healthcare.

When Veronica joined the military 11 years ago, she wasn’t sure which career field she wanted to pursue outside of her service. However, after watching military nurses save lives, she quickly gravitated toward the field of nursing.

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While nurses are dedicated to caring for others, they must also remember to care for themselves. Learning to grieve is an integral part of emotional well-being as most nurses will experience the loss of a patient at some point in their career. It is important to take steps to help prepare for those emotionally difficult moments.

“I encourage all nurses to have a grieving plan in place so they can process this loss in a healthy way,” said Susan Waltz, DNP, MSN, BSN, RN, an associate professor in the Master of Science in Nursing degree program at Chamberlain College of Nursing who has professional experience as a grief counselor.

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Volunteerism is one of the most gratifying ways nursing students can gain hands-on experience by sharing their knowledge and passion for care with others.

Recent research from the Corporation for National and Community Service shows that volunteers are 27 percent more likely to find employment than non-volunteers1.  While volunteerism provides individuals with a potential entry route into an organization where they would like to work, it also yields additional benefits for shaping one’s career path.

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