Long after the final test is taken and your graduation cap has been tossed in the air, you may find your thoughts wandering to friends you made and acquaintances you met during your education.

As new responsibilities and commitments may pull you in different directions, it can be difficult to stay connected and keep in touch with your classmates. Moreover, you may find yourself wondering if it’s even necessary to do so. It might take a little extra effort to maintain those connections post-graduation, but staying in touch with classmates provides many benefits, both personally and professionally.

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Like all nurses, Lynn Elliott, MS, RN, started her career wanting to make a difference in the lives of others. Now, after 40 years of nursing and impacting countless lives, she has been honored by the state of Florida for her contributions to public health, named one of the Sunshine state’s public health heroes.

But when she started out, she was only driven by a desire to help. And it was this drive which brought Elliott to new challenges and helped her overcome them.

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Hannah Byers, a student in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree program at Chamberlain College of Nursing’s Columbus campus, is working to help combat a national epidemic — the rising number of heart attacks and strokes. And she’s doing it through preventative care.

Each year, Americans suffer more than two million heart attacks and strokes.[1] The healthcare industry is evolving to focus on preventive care in an effort to lower healthcare costs and the prevalence of chronic disease such as these. Hannah and her peers hope to prevent these conditions, which are the first and fourth leading causes of death in the United States.[2]

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Getting involved in extracurricular activities while in nursing school can help you expand your experience, make new friends and create professional connections.

Nelly Coto, BSN, RN and 2013 graduate from Chamberlain’s Houston campusknows this firsthand. She was involved in a number of extracurricular activities and groups which positively impacted her growth as a student. “Getting involved was great,” said Coto. “It let me dive right in to all things nursing and really helped me immerse myself in what it meant to be a nurse.”

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Whether it’s an early morning or a late night, a long shift can be tough to get through. There are a lot of factors which can contribute to how you feel as your shift progresses, and one of the biggest can be hunger.

Earlier this year, we made our picks for the Top 5 Nutritional Snacks for Nurses, but we wanted to hear from you too. So we asked our fans on Facebook to share which foods they reach for when they need a boost. Here are the most popular responses:

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Online classes are a great way to learn. Benefits for students include flexibility to attend class from wherever they have a computer and internet connection, access to course materials 24 hours a day and the ability to learn from an institution they might not otherwise have access to.

Still, many students may feel wary about learning outside the classroom.

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Elizabeth Fildes, EdD, RN, CNE, CARN-AP, APHN-BC, DACACD, may be one nurse, but through her work, she’s helped improve the lives of thousands of people.

A professor in Chamberlain’s Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree program, Dr. Fildes founded the Nevada Tobacco Users’ Helpline in 1997 – a service that to date has served 40,000 people in their struggle to quit smoking.

Now she’s bringing her expertise back to her native Philippines as a volunteer consultant for the country’s new tobacco users’ quitline.

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You’ve studied nonstop for nearly three years. You can do medical calculations in your head. You’re on your way to graduating and becoming the nurse you have always wanted to be.

As you approach your final semesters of nursing school, it’s important to take some time and really examine your career goals and aspirations, says Sarah Vollmer, senior career services advisor at Chamberlain. “Think critically about where you are in your career, what’s important to you and where you want your career to go.”

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Nurses are no stranger to combat. They played a pivotal role during the Allied invasion of western Europe on D-Day, June 6, 1944.

Throughout World War II, nurses were almost always near combat while serving in field and evacuation hospitals, as well as aboard trains, ships and transport planes. Though ever in danger, they focused on caring for others. Fewer than four percent of the American soldiers who received medical care in the field or underwent evacuation died from wounds or disease.

Here’s a brief look at the significant contributions made by nurses on and after D-Day.

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