Thanks in part to TV dramas, emergency nursing – or emergency department (ED) nursing – is one of the highest-profile and most recognizable nursing specialties. These nurses treat patients who are critically ill or injured, often when time is of the essence and the cause or extent of the illness or injury is still unknown. READ MORE

On Friday in early May, I was posting a job lead from a local employer seeking graduates from our upcoming June class when a student came in to my office, sat down and worriedly exclaimed, “I need a job!”

It would have been tempting to hand him the job flyer and start prescribing tactics to help him. But when faced with career question, it’s important to make sure your core values and skills align with the career you choose. READ MORE

It’s said you never know where life will take you, and that’s just as true for nurses as it is for anyone. But as a nurse, moving from one state to another can have one complication:  you may not be able to just start interviewing for jobs. Instead, you might have to apply for a nursing license from your new home state.

If you’re a nurse interested in moving, or just going where life takes you, Chamberlain Career Services Advisor Victoria Bennett offers the following advice on preparing to get a nursing license in another state.

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Do you like the idea of working independently, in a varying environment, while making a huge impact on patients and their families? Home health nursing may be the specialty for you.

Home care nurses travel to patients’ homes to treat people who were recently discharged from the hospital or suffer from chronic conditions. A special subset, hospice nurses, treats those who are terminally ill.

Many home care nurses are employed by or affiliated with a hospital, but others work for independent agencies.

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There’s a lot about being a nurse which you don’t always find in other jobs. But did you know that you could travel the country as part of your job as a nurse?

Travel nurses move about the country (and sometimes the world) working in different healthcare facilities as needed. The concept itself originated as a way to help combat the nursing shortage.

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Love anatomy and physiology? The chance to do innovative things in a highly disciplined environment? Surgical nursing might be the specialty for you.

Lori Armbruster, MSN, RN, is Faculty Chair at Chamberlain’s St. Louis campus and a surgical nurse with 28 years of experience in the OR. She explained that surgical, or perioperative, nursing may have a long learning curve, but for nurses who love technology and organization, it can make for a very satisfying career.

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You’ve studied nonstop for nearly three years. You can do medical calculations in your head. You’re on your way to graduating and becoming the nurse you have always wanted to be.

As you approach your final semesters of nursing school, it’s important to take some time and really examine your career goals and aspirations, says Sarah Vollmer, senior career services advisor at Chamberlain. “Think critically about where you are in your career, what’s important to you and where you want your career to go.”

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