Nursing come in many forms and settings — correctional, labor & delivery and home carejust to name a few. Each of these settings often has its own unique rules and procedures, beyond the general best practices all nurses know and follow.

So it should come as no surprise that, around the world, healthcare standards and practices vary dramatically from one country to another.

For instance, did you know that, in the Philippines, a significant number of doctors head back to medical school to become nurses?

Find out more about this and other interesting nursing facts from around the world in this infographic put together by Scrubsmag.com.

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When choosing a college, there are a lot of factors to consider — cost, location, faculty and student support are among the most important criteria to new students. However, the role of a school’s accreditation status cannot be underestimated. Whether or not a school is accredited is a key indication of the quality of the institution and an assurance to the public of the education it provides.

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Long after the final test is taken and your graduation cap has been tossed in the air, you may find your thoughts wandering to friends you made and acquaintances you met during your education.

As new responsibilities and commitments may pull you in different directions, it can be difficult to stay connected and keep in touch with your classmates. Moreover, you may find yourself wondering if it’s even necessary to do so. It might take a little extra effort to maintain those connections post-graduation, but staying in touch with classmates provides many benefits, both personally and professionally.

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Whether it’s an early morning or a late night, a long shift can be tough to get through. There are a lot of factors which can contribute to how you feel as your shift progresses, and one of the biggest can be hunger.

Earlier this year, we made our picks for the Top 5 Nutritional Snacks for Nurses, but we wanted to hear from you too. So we asked our fans on Facebook to share which foods they reach for when they need a boost. Here are the most popular responses:

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You’ve studied nonstop for nearly three years. You can do medical calculations in your head. You’re on your way to graduating and becoming the nurse you have always wanted to be.

As you approach your final semesters of nursing school, it’s important to take some time and really examine your career goals and aspirations, says Sarah Vollmer, senior career services advisor at Chamberlain. “Think critically about where you are in your career, what’s important to you and where you want your career to go.”

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June is National Safety Month and a good time to take a look at the environments we work in to see just how safe they are and how safe they should be. For nurses this means taking a closer look at the clinical setting and noting if certain standards are being met.

There are some aspects of caregiving which pose higher safety risks than others. The American Nurses Association considers the following three areas as crucial for workplace safety.

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This is a big question. Becoming a nurse is no small task. You’ll find it to be one of the most challenging and rewarding experiences of your life.  And it’s important to note that there is no singular path to becoming a nurse. It’s different for everyone. So you’ll have to take some time and do some research to determine the best route for you.

In the most basic sense, to become a nurse you need to accomplish the following:

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Dwayne and Veronica Bryant, now husband and wife student nurses at Chamberlain College of Nursing’s Jacksonville campus, met while they were serving in the U.S. Air Force. Through experiences during their military service, they were soon drawn to careers in healthcare.

When Veronica joined the military 11 years ago, she wasn’t sure which career field she wanted to pursue outside of her service. However, after watching military nurses save lives, she quickly gravitated toward the field of nursing.

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Pamela Matthews is a woman with a big heart and career aspirations just as large.

A native Bostonian, she earned her bachelor’s degree in social work and began working with a local hospital, managing residential sites and group homes for people who were developmentally delayed. Pamela was responsible for all of the behavioral components of her caseload and acted as a liaison between her patients and their medical care teams. Concurrently, she volunteered with the Special Olympics, working with kids and adults with intellectual disabilities.

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