Thanks in part to TV dramas, emergency nursing – or emergency department (ED) nursing – is one of the highest-profile and most recognizable nursing specialties. These nurses treat patients who are critically ill or injured, often when time is of the essence and the cause or extent of the illness or injury is still unknown. READ MORE

Do you like the idea of working independently, in a varying environment, while making a huge impact on patients and their families? Home health nursing may be the specialty for you.

Home care nurses travel to patients’ homes to treat people who were recently discharged from the hospital or suffer from chronic conditions. A special subset, hospice nurses, treats those who are terminally ill.

Many home care nurses are employed by or affiliated with a hospital, but others work for independent agencies.


There’s a lot about being a nurse which you don’t always find in other jobs. But did you know that you could travel the country as part of your job as a nurse?

Travel nurses move about the country (and sometimes the world) working in different healthcare facilities as needed. The concept itself originated as a way to help combat the nursing shortage.


Daytime talk show host Katie Couric recently paid tribute to nurses and the important role they play in their patients’ lives. Her guest, Diana Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN, president of the American Academy of Nursing (AAN), highlighted another critical role of today’s nurses: decision-maker.

“In 2010, a study from the Institute of Medicine reported that nurses are not being used to their full potential,” Mason explained. “This finding is key because it recognizes that we cannot transform healthcare in our country without tapping into the potential of our nurses and the important role they can play at decision-making tables at all levels of healthcare organizations and for all healthcare policies.”


Love anatomy and physiology? The chance to do innovative things in a highly disciplined environment? Surgical nursing might be the specialty for you.

Lori Armbruster, MSN, RN, is Faculty Chair at Chamberlain’s St. Louis campus and a surgical nurse with 28 years of experience in the OR. She explained that surgical, or perioperative, nursing may have a long learning curve, but for nurses who love technology and organization, it can make for a very satisfying career.


Long after the final test is taken and your graduation cap has been tossed in the air, you may find your thoughts wandering to friends you made and acquaintances you met during your education.

As new responsibilities and commitments may pull you in different directions, it can be difficult to stay connected and keep in touch with your classmates. Moreover, you may find yourself wondering if it’s even necessary to do so. It might take a little extra effort to maintain those connections post-graduation, but staying in touch with classmates provides many benefits, both personally and professionally.


Like all nurses, Lynn Elliott, MS, RN, started her career wanting to make a difference in the lives of others. Now, after 40 years of nursing and impacting countless lives, she has been honored by the state of Florida for her contributions to public health, named one of the Sunshine state’s public health heroes.

But when she started out, she was only driven by a desire to help. And it was this drive which brought Elliott to new challenges and helped her overcome them.