Elizabeth Fildes, EdD, RN, CNE, CARN-AP, APHN-BC, DACACD, may be one nurse, but through her work, she’s helped improve the lives of thousands of people.

A professor in Chamberlain’s Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree program, Dr. Fildes founded the Nevada Tobacco Users’ Helpline in 1997 – a service that to date has served 40,000 people in their struggle to quit smoking.

Now she’s bringing her expertise back to her native Philippines as a volunteer consultant for the country’s new tobacco users’ quitline.

READ MORE

You’ve studied nonstop for nearly three years. You can do medical calculations in your head. You’re on your way to graduating and becoming the nurse you have always wanted to be.

As you approach your final semesters of nursing school, it’s important to take some time and really examine your career goals and aspirations, says Sarah Vollmer, senior career services advisor at Chamberlain. “Think critically about where you are in your career, what’s important to you and where you want your career to go.”

READ MORE

As nurses, we do our best to incorporate healthy habits into our day. But day-to-day challenges can sometimes limit our progress. Although there can be obstacles, the rewards for following a few healthy habits can pay off.

Here are some tips to help you stay healthy. READ MORE

While nurses are dedicated to caring for others, they must also remember to care for themselves. Learning to grieve is an integral part of emotional well-being as most nurses will experience the loss of a patient at some point in their career. It is important to take steps to help prepare for those emotionally difficult moments.

“I encourage all nurses to have a grieving plan in place so they can process this loss in a healthy way,” said Susan Waltz, DNP, MSN, BSN, RN, an associate professor in the Master of Science in Nursing degree program at Chamberlain College of Nursing who has professional experience as a grief counselor.

READ MORE

The core of nursing is care for others. While it is a rewarding and fulfilling career path, it can be exhausting for nurses who do not care for themselves in the same way they would care for a patient. While giving care to others, nurses tend to neglect care of themselves.

The stresses of a healthcare work environment can be particularly challenging for nurses because the profession is always changing. The role of the nurse is not stagnant, and with any rapid change comes stress.

READ MORE

According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, around 2.3 million men and women are incarcerated in U.S. jails and prisons. It’s a population with complex and diverse healthcare needs – injuries, chronic conditions, even palliative care.

Providing nursing care to this group of patients, and in this setting, is not a job for everyone, said Lorry Schoenly, PhD, RN, a correctional nursing specialist and visiting professor in Chamberlain’s MSN program. However, for the right nurse, it can also be extremely satisfying and rewarding specialty.

READ MORE

Pamela Matthews is a woman with a big heart and career aspirations just as large.

A native Bostonian, she earned her bachelor’s degree in social work and began working with a local hospital, managing residential sites and group homes for people who were developmentally delayed. Pamela was responsible for all of the behavioral components of her caseload and acted as a liaison between her patients and their medical care teams. Concurrently, she volunteered with the Special Olympics, working with kids and adults with intellectual disabilities.

READ MORE